Organ Recital (Timothy Noon)

Thursday 16th August 2018 at 19:00

Part of the 2018 Exeter Cathedral Organ Recital Series (find out more about the series). Programme to include Percy Whitlock’s “Plymouth Suite” as well as music by JS Bach and Louis Vierne.

Ticket information

Tickets £8 adults, £5 students, under 18s FREE. Available from 01392 285983 (Monday to Friday) and online. Booking fee applies.

About Timothy Noon

Timothy Noon received his early music education as a chorister at Hereford Cathedral, later learning the organ with Dr Roy Massey. At the age of seventeen he was appointed Organ Scholar of Canterbury Cathedral, and the following year became Organ Scholar at Christ Church, Oxford where he also read for a degree in music. In 1993 he became a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists, winning six prizes in the examination, including the coveted Limpus prize. On graduating with First Class Honours, Timothy was appointed sub-organist of St Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin. He returned to Canterbury Cathedral as Assistant Organist in January 1997, subsequently becoming Organist and Master of the Choristers of St Davids Cathedral (Wales), then Director of Music at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King in Liverpool.

He has appeared many times on television and radio and has made numerous commercial recordings to date as soloist, accompanist and conductor. As an organist, he is a frequent solo performer, giving concerts in many prestigious venues across Europe and New Zealand.

To be with his Kiwi wife, Elizabeth, Timothy moved to New Zealand in 2011, accepting the position of Director of Music at Auckland Cathedral of the Holy Trinity. Immersing himself in the country’s musical scene, he worked not only on a daily basis with the cathedral’s three choirs, but by serving as a council member of Australia and New Zealand College of Organists, on the governing body of the New Zealand Choral Federation, and participating as organist in projects with Auckland’s main orchestras.

In January 2016 Timothy returned to the UK (with Elizabeth!), to take up the post of Director of Music at Exeter Cathedral.

About the organ

In 1665 local organ builder John Loosemore created what has become one of the most distinctive and striking organ cases ever built.

In over three hundred years the organ has been expanded and updated to meet the ever changing musical demands of a living Cathedral, from the expansion and raising of Loosemore’s case and the moving of the impressive 32’ pipes to the South Transept, to the creation of an entirely new section of the organ in the Minstrels’ Gallery.

Containing over 4000 pipes, the organ is played from a console of four manuals and pedals which is situated on the central ‘pulpitum’ screen.

Newsletter signup

Newsletter Signup
By submitting this form you are giving express consent to be added to our database and to be contacted in the future